Featured Appearances

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Genetic Engineering and the Future of Food

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Behavioral Science and the Future of Risk Management

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Digital presentation to students at Hilton Elementary School.


Featured Publications

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Genetic engineering and its products both threaten and benefit United States national security in core areas of food security and public health. A nation whose people are sick or starving is not secure, and biotechnology has the potential to significantly impact food security and health. Increases come from the development of more robust organisms that are resistant to pests and drought (e.g., Rainbow papaya, American chestnut). However, such novel (same say unnatural) organisms raise questions of unintended consequences, such as the potential to disrupt or damage existing ecosystems and their constituents.

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This section discusses issues related to risk communication across a range of publicly perceived high risk industries (such as pharmaceuticals, nuclear, oil, etc.). It reports critically and provides analyses on risk communication as an outcome of risk research within these industries. Contributions are intended to include methods working towards the advancement of risk perception research and describe any lessons for successfully communicating to the public about risk.

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With the global population growing from seven to nine billion people by 2050, avoiding food waste would appear to be an easy way of feeding more people using resources already at hand. The relentless pursuit of efficiency by food manufacturers, which have greatly reduced food waste from all steps of food processing, has not always been appreciated by consumers and, in some cases, has been stigmatized by them. By reframing the conversation on food waste from one of quality or health to the frame of sustainability, public attitudes towards food scraps can be modified.

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In a hot, flat, hyper-connected world, public perception of risk may determine if agriculture will save the planet by 2050 or destroy it. Science and technology options may hold the key to solving the situation, but, if media experience with “pink slime” and raw milk are any indication, society may be in for a bumpy ride. This article will examine global trends in food and agriculture, the interplay between food safety and public perceptions of risk, and the role of risk communication in addressing public perceptions.

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Special Issue on Risk Culture and Crisis Communication.

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